Elena Soterakis on George Bellows

George Bellows, Excavation at Night, 1908, Oil on canvas, 33 x 44 inches No other artist captured the chaos created in the name of progress in early 20th century New York City better than George Bellows. His paintings of the Penn Station excavation, violent and...

Maria Calandra on Joan Miró

Joan Miró, Potato, 1928, Oil on Canvas, 39 3/4 x 32 1/8 inches, The Met With the potency of red bordering blue, Potato, recently re-installed at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is an invigorating walk through Miro’s fantastical world of invented pictorial language and...

Tony Robbin on Bonnard’s Bathers

It is often said that Pierre Bonnard’s paintings featuring bathers are intimate works, as the women are caught unawares, glimpsed in unguarded and private moments…

James Esber on George Grosz

George Grosz, The Painter of the Hole, 1948, Oil on canvas, 30 x 22 inches In 1947 George Grosz made a watercolor called Painter of the Hole, which was refined into a painting on canvas the following year. In the second version an artist (Grosz himself?) stares...

Philip Koch: Sailing Lessons from Edward Hopper

Edward Hopper, Sailing, 1911, Oil on canvas, 24 x 29 inches Last August I did some traveling to see art. As an artist I was determined to learn everything I could about the watercolorist Charles Burchfield. My destination was Salem, Ohio to visit the home where...

Marcela Florido on Stanley Spencer

Stanley Spencer, The Nativity, 1912, Oil on canvas, 40 x 60 inches I first encountered Stanley Spencer’s The Nativity hanging on the walls of the Houseman Room, the dining hall for faculty at UCL. The space in the painting was strangely described; the rhythm, set by...

Barry Nemett on Gwen John

The building weighs less than a flower. The parasol stem dreams about being a wicker chair…

Margaret Grimes on Ruth Miller

The still life paintings of Ruth Miller are at first glance deceptively modest. On closer viewing however, they have a compelling power comparable to a gravitational pull.

Barbara Zucker on Florine Stettheimer

I walked into MOMA in 1976 and fell in love: with a painting. It was a coup de foudre. The first thing that drew me to it was the wacky, white scalloped frame.

Catherine Howe on Charles E. Burchfield

Burchfield explained, “To the child sitting cozily in his home , the roar of the wind outside fills his mind full of visions of strange phantoms and monsters flying over the land.”