Barkley Hendricks on Louis Sloan

The snow would be waist high and the temperature freezing or below. Lou would be Eskimo-like…

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Painters on Paintings is a conversation between contemporary artists and their influences across time.

Note From the Editors

Welcome readers to our newly re-designed Painters on Paintings website. We will be using this section as a weekly column to highlight current shows, art-related events, cultural zeitgeists, and what we’ve seen lately, or wish to see, in the New York art world. Our new... read more

PoP Highlights

James Siena on Albrecht Dürer

Known primarily for his nearly unparalleled work in engraving and woodcut (and I say unparalleled because it is equal in every way to any painting or drawing), Albrecht Dürer managed to…

David Humphrey on James Ensor

Misreading pleases me almost as much as mishearing. The read or heard phrase arrives into consciousness seeming to belong to someone else…

Recent Articles

Joan Waltemath on Zen and the Art of Billy Al Bengston

“Stud”, an exhibition of Billy Al Bengston’s paintings at Venus over Manhattan Gallery this past November, afforded a unique opportunity to see the legendary West Coast painter in New York City. It is clearly a special moment for an artist.

And then the Real Nature Showed Up: Emilie Clark on Rubens

Last week I went to the Met to pick out a painting to write about for Painters on Painting. I had initially thought that I would write about a contemporary work, always feeling that I need to broaden my knowledge of contemporary painting. But then the election happened and I wanted to be in the Met.

John Dubrow on Titian

I first saw Titian’s Flaying of Marsyas in the winter of 1984. I had moved to Brooklyn from the Bay Area just 5 months before, when I heard the Flaying of Marsyas was at the Royal Academy in London for an exhibition on 16th Century Venetian painting. I quit my job, got a cheap flight and flew over.

Richard Kalina on Stuart Davis

A little while ago I went to the Stuart Davis retrospective at the Whitney. I was expecting to like it, and I did. I’ve seen my fair share of Davis’ paintings over the years, and I have particularly fond memories of his solo 1991 Metropolitan Museum exhibition, Stuart Davis: American Painter.